European Free Trade Agreement Serbia

In addition to duty-free trade between Member States, the Agreement establishes the accumulation of the origin of goods, which means that goods exported from Serbia are considered to be of Serbian origin when integrated materials come from another CEFTA country, the European Union, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland (including Liechtenstein) or Turkey, provided that at least 51% of the value added of the P rodukts in Serbia (if the value added of B. the value of materials used in Serbia). “This means that the agreements we have concluded so far with Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan must be replaced by a new, more modern agreement, now signed by Serbia with the entire EAWU, which includes, in addition to these three countries, Armenia and Kyrgyzstan,” Ljajic added. Mr Brnabic insisted that the agreement was not problematic with regard to Serbia`s EU integration process. “This is in no way contrary to our [pro] European policy; I believe that this is a complement to our European policy and to our path to the EU. Indeed, it is in the EU`s interest to become economically stronger. Serbia. and a free trade agreement with eawu will give us those opportunities,” Brnabic said after the singing ceremony. The agreement contains provisions concerning state-owned commercial enterprises, subsidies, anti-dumping and anti-competitive practices affecting trade relations between the parties, as well as safeguard disciplines.

Last year, trade between Serbia and the EES countries – a market of more than 180 million people – amounted to US$3.4 billion. Serbia and Russia are also strengthening military cooperation. EU officials stressed last month that while Serbia may have free trade agreements like the one with EAWU, these will have to be denounced as soon as Serbia becomes a member of the EU. Brnabic traveled to Moscow with Trade Minister Rasim Ljajic, who had previously told Serbian media in September that this was not a political agreement, but only a trade deal, as Serbia had signed with Turkey and CEFTA – the Central European Free Trade Agreement. The preface (other languages), published in November 2020 by Sabine Weyand, Director-General of DG Trade, provides an overview of the successes achieved in 2019 and the ongoing work for the EU`s 36 main preferential trade agreements. . . .